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Well... that's interesting light-show. Is that big cable connecting on her belly? --Kuopiofi (talk) 04:08, June 5, 2017 (UTC)

I still think Colette doesn't have the Spark of herself. Instead, she's receiving her father's Spark, through Paris. So this is not a "normal" breakthrough. — gpvos 07:42, June 6, 2017 (UTC)

Lil' problem with that theory: Colette's brain is in her head. Simon's brain is in his. The Spark is a brain structure factor, as Klaus's experiments have determined. And the Spark is hereditary. It's also evident from Gil's analysis of the mini hive engine that whoever is making them is not Lucrezia, and neither of the other two Lucrezia dybbuks besides Agatha's (that we know of) is in a Spark brain. At most, I think interfacing with the network while Daddy was plugged in too just awoke her own Spark. Occam's Razor! Remember, it's in Mechanicsburg still. --MadCat221 (talk) 12:58, June 6, 2017 (UTC)
I agree. Tarvek said he's been expecting her to break through at some point. And I'm pretty sure it's been stated somewhere (maybe not officially in-comic) that Spark breakthroughs are often provoked by extreme emotional moments. --Geoduck42 (talk) 20:00, June 6, 2017 (UTC)
It's part of Klaus's and Gil's analysis as they charge after the Search Engine, Agatha's breakthrough creation, after they tweek its instruction parameters alllll the way back in the very first chapter. Also, to clarify the bits on Lucrezia: Gil states that there has been no revolution in OtherTech, just evolutions of what has already been done. It's because the two known Lucrezia dybbuks out there besides the one locked down in Agatha by her Heterodyne locket are crammed into brains of non-Sparks. That also makes me wonder... does it need to be a top-tier Spark brain that a Lucrezia dybbuk would need to be forced upon to go full-power Other again, or just any Sparky brain?--MadCat221 (talk) 02:52, June 7, 2017 (UTC)

For anyone missing the reference to genius in what Colette is saying during her breakthrough:

"I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me." - Sir Isaac Newton

Newton, of course, also famously wrote about seeing further than most by "standing on the shoulders of giants," which is how we see Agatha a few strips later.  128.227.49.41 15:55, June 12, 2017 (UTC)